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    • #3234
      Wynne Echols
      Keymaster

      I thought it was time to do a little writing today. Please read the new blog and use the forum to shoot arrows at it or maybe even offer 2 more cents worth to it. Let us hear from you. WWE

    • #3235
      Jeff Fish
      Participant

      I’ve never reloaded a round before, but the deeper I get into this sport the more I become interested in learning. I’ve been a part of fine-tuning a load for a particular rifle and am blown away at how the smallest change can truly change the trajectory in a big way. I guess the overall bigger picture would be consistency at the start is key if you want to have consistency at the at the end.

      Thanks for sharing some of your methods. It helps a novice like me understand a little bit more.

    • #3241
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Good blog Wynne, I certainly need all the help I can get. This last shoot, I used new brass that I did not neck size. All I did was prime, charge and seat the bullets and the results showed that I didnta put enough time in my loading. I shot so much better last year, but I spent many more days at the range. I think good advice is good, but there is no substitute for trigger time. If I could just quit working, I might get better….lol. Good read Wynne and it obviously is working. You are shooting GREAT!

    • #3245
      Wynne Echols
      Keymaster

      Another little something that I forgot to mention. For anyone that might want to try using the mandrel process, if you think that you might want a little smaller mandrel{a little more neck tension} chuck the mandrel in a drill press and take some small grit sand paper and grind off the edges of the mandrel. Remember to go slow, a little goes a long way. What you take off of one side of the mandrel also comes off of the other side. Your efforts are doubled, so be careful. WWE

    • #3246
      Dave Burkart
      Participant

      Great read Wynne, I am in the no turn 2.704 camp and so far have resisted even cleaning up the necks. I do however use a .266 nitride neck bushing when I full length size the case after annealing. I am ending up with about .0015 neck tension and it seems to work for me. When I used a .265 bushing things seemed to not be as consistent. I think you hit the nail on the head when you say find what works for you and keep at it with a tweak here and there possibly.

      Dave

      • #3248
        Wynne Echols
        Keymaster

        Dave, good to hear from the great state of New York. How much longer are you fellows shooting? Please let us in on some of the shooting secrets that you have learned this year. We could maybe put some of them to use in the deep south and none of your fellow competitors will ever know you told us.

    • #3250
      Al Barr
      Participant

      Mr. Wynne, I enjoyed your discourse on precision reloading. I am a firm believer in consistency, and doing what works for you.

      My madness routine includes annealing fired cases first step. Full length sizing for .0015-.002 shoulder set back and neck reduced by .002 bushing smaller than fired diameter. Wet tumble with stainless media for one hour; never more two hours. Inside and outside neck chamfer (paranoid about case mouth preening in the tumbler causing pressure problems). Run case necks over Sinclair neck size expander mandrel.

      Prime, powder, coat seated portion of bullet with Imperial Die wax and seat bullet.

      I also trim to length and skim turn case necks after two fire forms.

    • #3262
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Good blog Wynne. I normally wipe necks with fine steel wool and just size necks with a Wilson die. I anneal after 3 firing and bump shoulders when they start getting tight when closing bolt. When seating with the arbor press and Wilson die I still notice different seating pressure. I guess I need to spend more time on brass prep! Thanks for the info.

    • #3263
      Bob Relinski
      Participant

      Mr. Wynne good write up on brass prep and as Al stated the key is consistency. What ever was done during the initial tuning process DON’T CHANGE IT. There is no secret neck dimension, prep process, or secret dipping compound to make a rifle out of tune shoot. How many times have you heard someone say they went to XX primers and the rifle really started to shoot. Fact is the rifle was never in tune and by changing to XX they lucked out and brought it in to tune. While back we took Wynnes load’s and left the necks carboned like I do, load went to crap with changing only this simple step. It works for me because I tuned this way at the start and his were cleaned when his load was tuned. Consistent neck prep is critical and one of the easiest way’s to screw things up

      Not about necks but about tuning I had to change powder lot’s today. H4350 same load that has been a tack driver (597 at the bottom) new powder is 75fps faster and 15 shot groups went from .75″ at 300 to 2″. After consulting my best friend Quickload it was determined .8 grains less powder to get back in tune where we were.

      My Mistake. When you get a rifle tuned and shooting buy enough primers, powder, and bullet’s of the same LOT number you tuned it with to shoot out the barrel and some extra.

    • #3265
      Bob Relinski
      Participant

      Mr. Wynne give the folk’s the pin trick I can’t type no more.

      • #3268
        Wynne Echols
        Keymaster

        I will try to copy/paste a link to an article that a good shooter posted on another website. After reading this article, I checked 20 random bullets and 3 were different from the other 17. Find out for yourself if you think it makes a difference. Good article just to make you good shooters aware of what other good shooters are doing to try to improve. WWWE

        http://forum.accurateshooter.com/index.php?topic=3880481.msg36617554#msg36617554

    • #3273
      Dave Gardner
      Participant

      As the season is winding down up north match 8 coming up this week end.
      It is now time to look back and see what I missed.. You think you didn’t miss anything but did you? As for me. I seem to miss a lot, always trying to shoot better get tighter groups try different powder, primers. Bullets. So looking back I notice some things have changed, am I keeping up with the times? Look around. See who is winning? What did they do different? Oh I see a new rest the seb max mmmmm a double post rest verse a single center post. With a joy The rear bags seem different too. Bigger. Heavier flatter bottoms ? The gun stocks look different too wider fronts and wider back ends too. The bottoms look like they are Paralell to each other?… Better tracking, faster time getting back to center, less time shooting in the conditions. And what kind of scope is that?.. 50 or 60. Power ?.. And a think to get to you rounds quicker. Wow. Did I miss the changes, is it time to upgrade am I falling behind with equipment upgrades . This shooting game is always and forever getting tougher smaller groups better scores, the equipment plays a major part in winning. But for some reason there is always one guy who wins with the old stuff so maybe I am over thinking this. What do you guys think about it?…WWE. Have a great day and keep your gun clean. Thanks. Dave

      • #3277
        Wynne Echols
        Keymaster

        David, I sure hope that you Northern boys are able to get all of your matches in before the snow begins to fall. It is still hot and dry here in West Alabama. I think you make a good point when you suggest to notice what the winners are doing and what they are using. Never crossed my mind that the double post front rest might be more sturdy than a single post. Truth is, us Reese Bottom shooters got one-uped by a good shooter using a ‘Harris Bi-Pod’. That would lead me to believe that there is no substitute for trigger time. Good equipment + lots of practice = good results.

        I read your post last night and you suggested that I keep my gun clean. A good cleaning process should probably be incorporated with the above. I made a video today and will post later where I let the cat out of the bag on my latest and greatest cleaning process. Cleaning made simple. WWE

    • #3280
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Greetings all. Being the newest member of the Reese Bottom shooting, sipping, scope setting and sausage tasting society, I have a few dumb questions that I hope to get smart answers for. I have a habit of getting the buggy ahead of the horse. I was once challenged to ride a horse in a cross country jumping event the night before the event. Naturally I accepted. The next day was not pretty but I finished the race thanks to the horse.
      Most of my career I carried a .45 colt 1911A1. 25 yards was LONG range for that weapon. If more firepower was necessary I added a 12 gauge pump. So the ability to consistently hit a target the size of a coffee saucer at 500 yards is truly amazing to me.
      My first question is; What is the best way to familiarize yourself with the terms, nomenclature, scoring, etiquette, equipment etc. of this sport. I figured out the .22 50 yard scoring but not the center fires.
      Is a 3x12x40 scope adequate for the .22 division. Which brand and type of .22 ammo seems to work best in different weapons. I have 2 vintage .22s that I love to shoot but the trigger pulls are rather humble. One is a Stevens mod 416 with a 26″ bull barrel carrying a Nikon 3x12x40. The other is a Mossburg 44US© with a 24″ bull barrel carrying a Leopold 3x9x32.Any thoughts on improving them would be welcome.( No, Wynne I don’t want to trade them in on an Anchutz, a very fine rifle.)
      My near term goal is to shoot a respectable .22 match. After that maybe try the big boys if I still have any coordination.
      Wynne One of my other hobbies is making knives. I would be glad to donate one for the winner of the next .22 match.
      Daryl, congrats on your win.

      • #3286
        Wynne Echols
        Keymaster

        Tom, thank you for becoming active on the forums. First, you are dealing with a hard-to-get-along-with website. It is very picky about photo size. The file size of photos taken with most SLR cameras is too big to upload. I will gladly help with this or you can simply right click on a photo and open with ‘Paint’ and resize . Please keep trying until you figure it out, we would love to see your knives.

        Now, on with the questions. Remember that everyone has to start somewhere and you have accomplished that. There is actually a blog written especially for new shooters. D. W. would be a good one to answer questions for you. Lots of info on http://www.accurateshooter.com and many other websites. Attend other matches and converse with the shooters. I have never met a good shooters that was not willing to encourage a new shooter. As far as the ammo question, and others might disagree, for target .22 shooting, I have been told that sub sonic ammo works better than high velocity. As to which brand, I have no opinion. A good scope would be left up to the shooter, but I would recommend something with fine crosshairs or maybe a very small dot. I have noticed that a rifle scope intended for hunting has very heavy crosshairs and at longer distances seems to cover up the intended point of aim. I have found it hard to hit something that you cannot see. Hopefully others will share their answers to your questions. Keep them coming. My pledge to you is that, in time, I will get you an answer to any question you ask. WWE

    • #3281
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      An example of one of my knives.

    • #3284
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Wynne,
      Good blog Wynne if sure should get folks to thinking some. Back a few or more years ago there was a bunch of “Point Blank” benchrest shooters wanting a good place to shoot and see just how accurate any one could be if you removed the wind from the equation.

      So was born the Houston Wharehouse. This was a working business open 5 days a week and sometimes more than that. In the late 70’s and early 80’s it also was one of the best kept secrets of Benchrest shooting. The Wharehouse was a study started by two men Virgel King and Bob Fisher. Those two men did all of the work, cleared a space over 300 yds right slap dap down the middle of the building and built a bullet stop and backstop as well as one concrete shooting bench. The shooting bench and the backstop bullet trap were on casters and were rolled out of the way during the day while the folks did there work.

      Shooting there was by invitation only and over the years it was up and running somewhere around 30 shooters got the chance to try there luck.

      Virgel Fisher was in truth the brains behind the Wharehouse. He also had no interest at all in any form of competition. Mr. Fisher was an accuracy buff and that was all he was ever interested in. This place was opened up and all of the shooting done there was to see just how accurate it was possible to be.

      In an interview Mr. Fisher said there were 27 “O” groups shot at the Wharehouse over those years. That’s right zero groups–five shots in one hole and that hole measured bullet diameter.

      Some of the ideas and information learned from those shoots are still with us all in Benchrest shooting. Virgel Fisher was always a little closed mouthed about what was and was not learned at those shoots.

      In his one and only interview he would not share very much about the nuts and bolts of reloading. what he did reveal falls right into what Wynne has brought up in this blog. He didn’t talk about neck tension in particular but when asked the question at the end of the interview. “Mr. Fisher what one thing made the most difference in the size of the groups?” His answer was curt and to the point and said ” The one thing that made those zero groups possible and always made the most difference was Brass Preparation.

      Food for thought? Me thinks so…

      Gunny

      • #3287
        Wynne Echols
        Keymaster

        Gunny, great read and thanks for sharing. The look on that tiger’s face is exactly how I feel when one of the rifles ‘throws a bullet'{maybe because of poor brass prep} Welcome back!!! WWE

    • #3288
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Still trying to upload a picture of various knives that I would be glad to donate as prizes in .22 matches

      • #3289
        Wynne Echols
        Keymaster

        Please email it to me and let me work with it or follow the above instructions. WWE

    • #3308
      brett collins
      Participant

      another article i enjoyed reading and more food for thought.
      http://www.accurateshooter.com/technical-articles/reloading/complete-precision-case-prep/

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