Helpful hints

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    • #1027
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I thought we might have a sharing thread on the Reese Bottom’s forum. One tip I have picked up over the years is when mounting a scope in your rings one way to ensure that you have your scope level, if your rings aren’t too high, you can slip a feeler gauge in between the flat on the bottom of the scope directly on the other side of the scope from the elevation turret and the top of your base, assuming you are using a one-piece base, Piccatiny or Davidson. Just keep adding leafs of the feeler gauge until you can barely get it in and out of that space. Make sure you remove it before you cinch the ring screws down completely or you may capture your feeler gauge and have to loosen the screws to get it back out.

      Please post here and let me know if this has been helpful, and pick something to share yourself.

    • #1033
      Wynne Echols
      Keymaster

      Gary, I learned something tonight. Thanks for sharing. I never had noticed the flat area on the bottom of a rifle scope. I had to see for myself. I am attaching a photo of the mentioned area although this scope is atop a little hunting rifle with split mounts and a very wide gap. I can see where this would work well on a one piece rail. This is great stuff and my wish is that others will be willing to share these small tips that could make a huge difference. Thanks again, WWE

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    • #1045
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I like to use the plumb line method. I level my rifle on the bench using a bubble level across the rings without the top half of the rings on. Down range (300 yards away) I have a yellow rope about 12 feet long with an old window weight on one end hanging from a tree limb. I set the scope in the rings and rotate to line up the reticle with the rope. I also use one of the levels that goes into the bolt raceway to insure the gun stays level as I tighten the rings. This is the most accurate method that I have found.

    • #1048
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      This next technique requires the use of a borescope. I hate a carbon ring, and one of the best ways not to have one is to have a short distance between the case mouth and the beginning of the leade. We all need to trim our brass, but we don’t need any more room between the case mouth and the beginning of the leade than “just enough.” In other words, in a 6mmBr maximum length is 1.560 and recommended trim length is 1.550. I take an old case and drill out the primer pocket just enough for my borescope to be placed through it. Then I place the case into the chamber and put my borescope through the enlarged primer pocket and push it up to the point I can see how the case mouth relates to the beginning of the leade. If 1.560 gives me plenty of room, there is no need for me to trim it back and make a larger area for the carbon ring to grow. Also, this technique supports the borescope and centers it in the center of the barrel, so you can use this when scoping your bore.

      • #1050
        Wynne Echols
        Keymaster

        Gary, Have you determined how many rounds down the tube before the carbon ring begins to affect accuracy? Seems to me, that for those fortunate enough to have a bore scope, it would be simpler to trim the cases a little shorter and not have to worry about trimming after every shooting. Does this long length require you to have to trim after every shooting? Thanks for sharing. WWE

    • #1049
      Wynne Echols
      Keymaster

      Good stuff guys. I must admit that I have fudged a little and slipped up and down the bench rest line and peeped through other shooter’s rifle scopes. I noticed that many of the other shooter’s scopes do not line up with my eye. For the scope owner or the peeper, wouldn’t the rifle end up being canted? Will an accurate rifle allow for any cant before the results are effected.

    • #1061
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Wynne, I don’t have any idea when the carbon ring would affect the accuracy of a rifle. My priority has always been not to get one. I understand that it can pinch the mouth of the case on the bullet and have the same result as crimping. If you are already running a hot load, it could raise pressure over the top.

      It is much easier to stay on top of the carbon ring and remove it before there’s a problem.

    • #1301
      Wynne Echols
      Keymaster

      A great little tool for dressing up the inside of the brass cartridge necks. Simply a caliber specific brass bore brush with 0000 steel wool spun into the bristles.

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