annealing machine help

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    • #3314
      brett collins
      Participant

      gentlemen for years i have been doing it the hard way (drill and socket)
      but now i would like to step up and get something faster and a little more precise.
      for those of you that use a annealing machine what would your recommendations be.
      and where did you purchase it from. thank you

    • #3315
      Wynne Echols
      Keymaster

      Brett, there are several out there. If the link below works, look at this one. I do know that the Bench Source Annealer works and is simple to use. WWE

      http://www.bench-source.com/id81.html

    • #3324
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I use the Bench source annealer and it works great. Customer service is great. I left mine plugged up and lightning got it. They sent me a new one with a return label for the old one!

    • #3344
      Al Barr
      Participant

      Brett, let us know how that new annealer works out.

    • #3369
      Mike Reekie
      Participant

      I bought 100 pieces of Lapua brass for my 6BR, and have fired most of them about five times now. I have not ever annealed these cases, and I have no equipment to do it. The automatic annealers are quite expensive, but using a hand-held torch and low speed drill seems kinda iffy. I would probably ruin many case. Of course I could just keep buying new brass. Is it really worth it to anneal cases? Do you actually achieve better accuracy? What is a SURE sign that you must anneal cases? Do you know of anyone who will anneal cases for a fee?

    • #3370
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Mike, You bring up an interesting point that being “Is it really worth it to anneal cases”

      If you take a look at works and what doesn’t, I the realm of accurate shooting at some point you are going to have to look at the Point Blank Bench Rest crowd. Granted they shoot at 100 and 200 yds but there Worlds Record is a group that measured .0075. That’s pretty damn close to a one whole group.

      So lets just look at these fellers and what “THEY” do. In almost every case they do not pre-load for a match. They load and shoot at the range changing the load for the changing conditions through out the day. The also will fire the same exact shell casing, or maybe five casings as they do shoot 5 shot groups, for that match. I have spoken with at least a dozen or so of these shooters and none that I spoke to ever Annealed a case over the lifetime of that casing. Interesting stuff HUHH?

      Somewhere the idea got around that to have accurate AMMO it needs to be consistant in every aspect. Nothing wrong with that idea that I can see. I went the annealing route for over a year or so. I would anneal every case after each and every firing. I owned a annealing machine , mine was a Ballistic Edge model 400. It is a great machine and when properly set up is mere childs play to use. However after that year of using it after every firing I found “NO” difference what so ever on the target, annealed or not annealed.

      So my thoughts on this subject, Not a damn thing wrong with annealing your brass, it also is not a “Must” do to have accurate Ammo. It is just that simple as far as I am concerned.

      Now how do you know if your brass “HAS” to be annealed? The only way I can see is that over time the brass becomes brittle from being over worked, when this happens you will start to see split necks. I had some lapua 6.5×47 brass that had dozens or firings on it maybe like 20 or 25 no annealing was done to this brass and it never did split. The primer pockets got loose finally and I chunked that brass as there is nothing you can do for loose primer pockets.

      Gunny

      Picture: Long Range Sniping when it means the most…

      • #3375
        Wynne Echols
        Keymaster

        Gunny, I read an article recently on another website and was surprised when the poster suggested that the term “work hardened” is caused more by the ‘firing process’ than by the ‘sizing process’. This person also stated that it had been his experience that the brass seemed to perform better after the first firing after annealing and that he has had better results annealing after every third firing. I guess, to each his own, but that was the first time that I had heard it suggested that firing work hardens brass. WWE

    • #3376
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Wynne,
      I am certainly no expert, and don’t claim to be. I have lived a pretty long time and I did stay in a Holiday Inn Express once upon a time. But as I set and ponder the article you are referring to I must ask a couple of questions of this writer.

      First question would be: how do you know if it is firing or sizing that works the brass?

      If you fire it and then reload it seems to me that sizing that brass is going to need to be in there somewhere. So which is it as both need to happen for you to reload a case.

      The only way for him not to resize his cases is he either doesn’t ever fire one, or in his reloading regime he doesn’t size them before reloading them. If he in fact is not resizing his cases and only firing them, he must be shooting No Neck tension at all. Another words he would just reprime the case drop powder, drop a bullet into the case ( and here I mean drop a bullet into the case as without some neck tension the bullet will just fall into the unsized case) and then shoot. He would not have anyway to determine seating depth because there is no neck tension to hold the bullet, it would be just a slip fit into the case and end up setting on top of the powder column. Where ever that would be.

      That would then lead to another whole set of problems. With the bullet setting on the powder column, it then would have its base below the neck and maybe even below the shoulder depending on how much powder is in the case. This would lead to so much of the fired powder charge escaping around the bullet on ignition that he would have erratic Pressure and not very good results on paper me would think.

      Oh well I for sure don’t know if its the sizing or the firing causing the brass to get brittle, I mean I’m just an old Blind Marine setting up late and reading on the computer.

      Gunny

      • #3378
        Wynne Echols
        Keymaster

        Roland, my take on the article that I was referring to was that the guy was sizing his brass, but his claim was that the firing process had more hardening affect on the brass than the sizing process and I had never heard that before. As you said, how can one really tell. Thanks, WWE

    • #3379
      Mike Reekie
      Participant

      Gunny, Wynne….thanks for your comments. I think I will skip the annealing, keep an eye out for cracks and splits, enlarged primer pockets, difficult bolt closing….so need to bump the shoulder back…and just buy a new batch of Lapua brass from time to time. That is probably cheaper than a fancy annealing machine. I enjoy the company of you fine shooters and look forward to many future contests.

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